1st Sentence Friday

“The last thing Frank Borman needed was a phone call when he was trying to fly his spacecraft.”

~Apollo 8 by Jeffrey Kluger

Sunday Poem

A Day for Wandering by Clinton Scollard

I SET apart a day for wandering;
I heard the woodlands ring,
The hidden white-throat sing,
And the harmonic West,
Beyond a far hill-crest,
Touch its Aeolian string.
Remote from all the brawl and bruit of men,
The iron tongue of Trade,
I followed the clear calling of a wren
Deep to the bosom of a sheltered glade,
Where interwoven branches spread a shade
Of soft cool beryl like the evening seas
Unruffled by the breeze.
And there—and there—
I watched the maiden-hair,
The pale blue iris-grass,
The water-spider in its pause and pass
Upon a pool that like a mirror was.

I took for confidant
The diligent ant
Threading the clover and the sorrel aisles;
For me were all the smiles
Of the sequestered blossoms there abloom—
Chalice and crown and plume;
I drank the ripe rich attars blurred and blent,
And won—Content!

from Bartleby

Saturday Save

This weeks Old But Not Forgotten is a novel by an old favorite author – In the Forest by Edna O’Brien.

Edna O’Brien writes wonderful characters. She’s an author I want to go back to read, but there are always so many books to read!

In the Forest is a bit of a murder mystery and the idea of it comes from a true story. “The Kinderschreck” (someone of whom small children are afraid) is the main focus. The focus of the story is how someone comes to be a killer.

1st Sentence Friday

“My mother had always been the one to pick me up from nursery school, but one late June afternoon in 1969, a couple of weeks before my fourth birthday, my father arrived first and pushed me into the backseat of his gray Chevy Malibu.”

~ Rebel Mother: My Childhood Chasing the Revolution by Peter Andreas

Sunday Poem

Wise by Lizette Woodworth Reese

AN apple orchard smells like wine;
A succory flower is blue;
Until Grief touched these eyes of mine,
Such things I never knew.

And now indeed I know so plain
Why one would like to cry
When spouts are full of April rain—
Such lonely folk go by!

So wise, so wise—that my tears fall
Each breaking of the dawn;
That I do long to tell you all—
But you are dead and gone.

from Bartleby 

Saturday Save

This weeks Old But Not Forgotten title is The Golden Tulip by Rosalind Laker.

An historical novel recreating the golden age of Dutch art. Johannes Vermeer, is the teacher, Francesca is the student. Pieter van Doorne, a tulip merchant the love interest. Will Francesca be able to follow her heart and her talent? What happens to Pieter as the tulip craze hits.

Read The Golden Tulip and compare it to Girl With a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier.

1st Sentence Friday

“On Thursday, September 5th, 1912, Ellen Grice let out a terrifying scream.”

~ Blood at the Root: a Racial Cleansing in America by Patrick Phillips

Sunday Poem

A Pitcher of Mignonette by Henry Cuyler Bunner

A PITCHER of mignonette
In a tenement’s highest casement,—
Queer sort of flower-pot—yet
That pitcher of mignonette
Is a garden in heaven set,
To the little sick child in the basement—
The pitcher of mignonette,
In a tenement’s highest casement.

from Bartleby